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Office of Emergency Management

 

 

  Culpeper County Emergency Services takes pride in our service to County residents. 

 

 
Who are we?  There are ten volunteer Fire and/or Rescue stations serving our citizens. 
Volunteers at these stations are supplemented by a career staff of twenty-three
employees of the County Office of Emergency Services.

 

What do we do? With a blend of volunteers and career employees, we respond to calls for fire,
rescue or emergency medical services. 

 

Who Pays? Due to an increase in demand for Fire and Rescue services in Culpeper County,
the operating budget has increased. To offset the increase in budget, a program
called Revenue Recovery was instituted. With this program, Culpeper County Office of Emergency Services
applies directly to Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance companies for financial
reimbursement for the cost of necessary ambulance transports.

 

Where does the money go? All funds recovered from insurance companies through the
Revenue Recovery program are put back into the County’s budget for expenses
of career personnel in Emergency Medical Services. This will support personnel trained in advanced life support.

 

What about Volunteer Fire and Rescue Departments? The County supports operating
costs but community donations support capital operating expenses. 
Volunteer Fire and Rescue Departments still need your support and donations!

 

What if I can’t pay? Never hesitate to call 911 because of inability to pay or lack of insurance.

 

How will I pay my bill?  The County has a program called Compassionate Billing. For additional information,

please contact the Culpeper County Office of Emergency Services.

 

 
Key Facts About Flu

Key Facts about Influenza (Flu) & Flu Vaccine


 What is influenza (also called flu)?
 Signs and symptoms of flu
 How flu spreads
 Period of contagiousness
 How serious is the flu?
 Complications of flu
 Preventing seasonal flu: Get vaccinated
 When to get vaccinated against seasonal flu
 Who should get vaccinated?
 Who is at high risk for developing flu-related complications?
 Who else should get vaccinated?
 Use of the nasal spray seasonal flu vaccine
 Who should not be vaccinated against seasonal flu?
 

What is influenza (also called flu)?
The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose,
throat, and lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best
way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine each year.

Signs and symptoms of flu
People who have the flu often feel some or all of these signs and symptoms:

 Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
 Cough
 Sore throat
 Runny or stuffy nose
 Muscle or body aches
 Headaches
 Fatigue (very tired)
 Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than
adults.
 

*It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

How flu spreads
Most experts believe that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough,
sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby. Less
often, a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and
then touching their own mouth, eyes or possibly their nose.
mouth, eyes or possibly their nose.

Period of contagiousness
You may be able to pass on the flu to someone else before you know you are sick, as well as while
you are sick. Most healthy adults may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms
develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Some people, especially young children and
people with weakened immune systems, might be able to infect others for an even longer time.

How serious is the flu?
Flu is unpredictable and how severe it is can vary widely from one season to the next depending on
many things, including:

 what flu viruses are spreading,
 how much flu vaccine is available
 when vaccine is available
 how many people get vaccinated, and
 how well the flu vaccine is matched to flu viruses that are causing illness.

Certain people are at greater risk for serious complications if they get the flu. This includes older people,
young children, pregnant women and people with certain health conditions (such as asthma, diabetes,
or heart disease), and persons who live in facilities like nursing homes.

Flu seasons are unpredictable and can be severe. Over a period of 30 years, between 1976 and 2006,
estimates of flu-associated deaths in the United States range from a low of about 3,000 to a high
of about 49,000 people.

Complications of flu
Complications of flu can include bacterial pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections,
dehydration, and worsening of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma,
or diabetes.

Preventing seasonal flu: Get vaccinated
The single best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccine each season. There are two types of
flu vaccines:

 “Flu shots” — inactivated vaccines (containing killed virus) that are given with a needle.
There are three flu shots being produced for the United States market now.
o The regular seasonal flu shot is “intramuscular” which means it is injected into muscle (usually
in the upper arm). It has been used for decades and is approved for use in people 6 months of age
and older, including healthy people, people with chronic medical conditions and pregnant women.
Regular flu shots make up the
bulk of the vaccine supply produced for the United States.
o A hi-dose vaccine for people 65 and older which also is intramuscular. This vaccine was first
made available during the
2010-2011 season.
o An intradermal vaccine for people 18 to 64 years of age which is injected with a needle into the
“dermis” or skin. This vaccine is being made available for the first time for the 2011-2012 season.
 The nasal–spray flu vaccine — a vaccine made with live, weakened flu viruses that is given as
a nasal spray (sometimes called LAIV for “Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine”). The viruses in the
nasal spray vaccine do not cause the flu. LAIV is approved for use in healthy* people 2 to 49 years
of age who are not pregnant.

About two weeks after vaccination, antibodies develop that protect against influenza virus
infection. Flu vaccines will not protect against flu-like illnesses caused by non-influenza
viruses.

The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the three influenza viruses that research suggests will
be most common.

When to get vaccinated against seasonal flu
Yearly flu vaccination should begin in September, or as soon as vaccine is available, and continue
throughout the flu season which can last as late as May. This is because the timing and duration of
flu seasons vary. While flu season can begin early as October, most of the time seasonal flu
activity peaks in January, February or later.

Who should get vaccinated?
Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine each year. This recommendation has been in
place since February 24, 2010 when CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted
for “universal” flu vaccination in the U.S. to expand protection against the flu to more people.
While everyone should get a flu vaccine each flu season, it’s especially important that certain
people get vaccinated either because they are at high risk of having
serious flu-related complications or because they live with or care for people at high risk for
developing flu-related complications.

Who is at high risk for developing flu-related complications?
 Children younger than 5, but especially children younger than 2 years old
 Adults 65 years of age and older
 Pregnant women
 American Indians and Alaskan Natives seem to be at higher risk of flu complications
 People who have medical conditions including:
o Asthma (even if it’s controlled or mild)
o Neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions [including disorders of the brain, spinal cord,
peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy (seizure disorders), stroke,
intellectual disability (mental retardation), moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular
dystrophy, or spinal cord injury]
o Chronic lung disease (such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and cystic fibrosis)
o Heart disease (such as congenital heart disease, congestive heart failure and coronary artery
disease)
o Blood disorders (such as sickle cell disease)
o Endocrine disorders (such as diabetes mellitus)
o Kidney disorders
o Liver disorders
o Metabolic disorders (such as inherited metabolic disorders and mitochondrial disorders)
o Weakened immune system due to disease or medication (such as people with HIV or AIDS, or cancer,
or those on chronic steroids)
o People younger than 19 years of age who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy
o People who are morbidly obese (Body Mass Index [BMI] of 40 or greater)


Who else should get vaccinated?
Other people for whom vaccination is especially important are:

 People who live in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities
 People who live with or care for those at high risk for complications from flu, including:
o Health care workers
o Household contacts of persons at high risk for complications from the flu
o Household contacts and caregivers of children younger than 5 years of age with particular
emphasis on vaccinating contacts of children younger than 6 months of age (children younger than 6
months are at highest risk of flu-related complications but are too young to get vaccinated)

Use of the nasal spray seasonal flu vaccine
Vaccination with the nasal-spray flu vaccine is an option for healthy* people 2 to
49 years of age who are not pregnant. Even people who live with or care for those in a high risk
group (including health care workers) can get the nasal-spray flu
vaccine as long as they are healthy themselves and are not pregnant. The one exception is health
care workers who care for people with severely weakened
immune systems who require a protected hospital environment; these people
should get the inactivated flu vaccine (flu shot).

Who should not be vaccinated against seasonal flu?

Some people should not be vaccinated without first consulting a physician. They include:

 People who have a severe allergy to chicken eggs.
 People who have had a severe reaction to an influenza vaccination in the past.
 Children younger than 6 months of age (influenza vaccine is not approved for use in this age
group).
 People who have a moderate or severe illness with a fever should wait to get vaccinated until
their symptoms lessen.
 People with a history of Guillain–Barré Syndrome (a severe paralytic illness, also called
GBS) that occurred after receiving influenza vaccine and who are not at risk for severe illness
from influenza should generally not receive vaccine. Tell your doctor if you ever had
Guillain-Barré Syndrome. Your doctor will help you decide whether the vaccine is recommended for
you.

 

If you have questions about whether you should get a flu vaccine, consult your health care
provider.

For more information, you may visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov
 

 
Office of Emergency Management

Being prepared...read "Preparing for Terrorism". Learn how to protect yourself, your family, your friends and your community in the event of a terrorism attack. Be aware...be prepared.

 

Read our Disaster Preparedness Statement, it outlines how you and your family can prepare in advance. Is your family ready for an unexpected emergency? Be sure with ourFamily Preparedness Plan. This plan includes checklists and pointers to educate your family about how to and what to do in an emergency. This is a must-read for every family!

 

Want to know how the County reacts to an emergency? The Culpeper County Emergency Operations Plan is now available online!

 

Fire and Rescue personnel--do you need training, or is it time for recertification? Here is a complete listing of upcoming training. You can even register for these classes right here!

 

The burn law is in effect from February 15th until May 31st, midnight until 4PM.  The unattended distance requirements are 150ft during non-burn law periods and 300ft during the burn law.  It is requested that Culpeper County Dispatch be contacted at 727-7900 before controlled burns are started.

 
Contact Information

Department of Emergency Services


14022 Public Safety Court
Culpeper Virginia 22701


(540) 727-7161 (Phone) 
(540) 727-8898(Fax)


Director:  Warren Jenkins

 
 
CCVFRA

Do you have what it takes? Join the Volunteer Fire Service in Culpeper County 540-445-1291

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